Open Your Head EP – Jackson Almond

Jackson Almond describes himself as a Northerner. He releases his tracks on WotNot Music. The rest you’ll have to do yourself.

Anyway, Open Your Head is a tasty EP. Smooth house with some obvious afro influences. My two picks are Common (Dauwd-y fare with some crashing piano drops and tasty Romare-y samples) and Ee Ye.

Bonus track: for you, my loyal reader, you get another taste – on this number Frits Wentink meets Laurence Guy. Not a bad matching if you ask me

Super Bar Konon Mousso (K&F Edit) – Amadou Balaké

If you’ve had the good fortune to see a Krywald & Farrer set you’ll know what they are all about. As Percolate front-men Jack Farrer and Edward Krywald-Sanders have had it pretty good over the last few years, and it’s not hard to see why when they release re-rubs of this quality. Souped up afro-goodness. Upbeat, funky, disco-laced good times.

And here is the original by Burkina Faso’s own Amadou Balaké.

Orange Tree Edits

Is it January? Is it? Really? Get this hour long mix of divine afro magic down your earholes and transport yourself the hell outta here.* It is mixed by Orange Tree Edits label boss Jimmy Rouge, so if you like I highly recommend checking out their Soundcloud page.

* I’m doing okay, honestly.

Koyma Hondo – Boncana Maïga

*GUEST POST*

Likelihood is that a few of you might be feeling a little blue right about now, so, in the spirit of getting through January, check out this fella from Mali, Boncana Maïga, who’s been a big deal in the latin-soul scene for c. 40 years.  This EP is more on the afro-funk end of things, so, stick it on and bounce your way through the opening salvos of 2019.  Weirdly the final track, Petroci, was written as the soundtrack for an oil company of the same name from the Ivory Coast.  We hate oil companies, but, boy do we love afro-funk eh.

Enjoy,

Winston

 

Projections – Romare

Every Sunday I bring you something a little more downtempo to ease you back into the world.

Romare specialises in taking samples from Afro-American culture and reimagining them into super original, modern electronic tracks. Given that he’s a London-born white man there are some that think his approach is a little disrespectful. I’ll leave you to decide where you sit on that subject. Either way, it’s definitely worth a listen (and if it is your jam, you’re in luck – there’s a second album).